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Big in Japan

U.S. premiere!
Director John Jeffcoat in attendance on 2/27 and 2/28!
Post-screening live sets with Tennis Pro on 2/20 and 2/21!

Feb 20 - Mar 05

(John Jeffcoat, 2014, United States, DCP, 100 min)

Making its theatrical premiere in Seattle after world premiering at SXSW, Big in Japan is an upbeat rock 'n roll road movie by local director (and founding member of Northwest Film Forum) John Jeffcoat (Outsourced). Creative nonfiction meets comedy, as Seattle-based band Tennis Pro play versions of themselves in their quest for fame. The guys are about to call it quits on their hometown: bored with their day jobs and unable to build a fan base in the local music scene, the trio sets out to make it big in Japan. Comedic adventures, cross-culture connections, rock concerts, and a zanily psychedelic animated sequence ensues. 

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La Notte

Screening held at the Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Avenue
Post-screening discussion moderated by Sean Nelson!

Mar 03

(1961, Italy, 115 min)

La Notte is the second film Antonioni made in a year, and it tells the story of a day in the life of an unfaithful married couple and their deteriorating relationship. The plot is not a good index for the film, however; the key is the use of the camera as a pen that explores the world as a visual corollary of inner life.

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Festival of (In)appropriation

Curated by Jaimie Baron, Lauren Berliner and Greg Cohen
Filmmakers Chris Vargas and Greg Youmans in attendance!

Mar 05

Whether you call it collage, compilation, found footage, détournement, or recycled cinema, the incorporation of already existing media into new artworks is a practice that generates novel juxtapositions and new meanings and ideas, often in ways entirely unrelated to the intentions of the original makers. Founded in 2009, the Festival of (In)appropriation is a yearly showcase of contemporary, short (20 minutes or less), audiovisual works that appropriate existing film, video, or other media and repurpose it in “inappropriate” and inventive ways. 

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Wild Canaries

Seattle premiere!
Filmmakers in attendance March 12!

Mar 06 - Mar 12

(Lawrence Michael Levine, United States, 2014, 99 min, DCP)

Director Lawrence Michael Levine describes his Brooklyn-set madcap detective-style murder comedy as "50% screwball, 50% suspense.” Husband and wife filmmaking team Sophia Takal and director Lawrence Michael Levine star as recently engaged but perpetually bickering couple Barri and Noah. When their elderly downstairs neighbor suddenly kicks the bucket, the flighty Barri immediately suspects foul play. Cue a hilariously harebrained investigation as Barri—outfitted in a Columbo-style trench coat—enlists her secretly-in-love-with-her lesbian roommate to help her get to the bottom of the matter.

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Jeremy Moss: Space immaterial/Immaterial place

Visiting filmmaker!
Introduction and Q&A moderation by Johanna Gosse!

Mar 07

The films of Jeremy Moss explore the intersection of expressionistic tendencies, place and the moving body. His work ranges from surrealist documentary, to abstract hand-made 16mm films, to dance for camera, to essay film. Join us for an immersive optical and sonic experience, and revel in cinema’s capacity for meditation and rigorous experimentation.

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She's Beautiful When She's Angry

Mar 08

(Mary Dore, United States, 2014, 92 min)

This joyously-received documentary charts a crucial era in the modern women's movement (1966-1971). Returning to Seattle for a special screening on International Women's Day, it covers the founding of NOW, with ladies in hats and gloves, through to the emergence of more radical factions of women’s liberation (from intellectuals like Kate Millett to the street theatrics of WITCH-Women’s International Conspiracy from Hell!).  

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The Clouds That Touch Us Out of Clear Skies

Co-presented with UW-Bothell Women's Global Health class
Supply drive -- see details below!
 

Mar 08

(Lynn Shelton, United States, 2000, 16mm, 27 min)

During this event for International Women's Day, special guest and local filmmaker Lynn Shelton will present a rare screening of her 16mm film The Clouds that touch us out of clear skies, a haunting, imagistic documentary that tells a personal miscarriage story. Followed by a conversation with the filmmaker. The evening will conclude with readings and performances by local feminists/writers Sonya Vatomsky and Jocelyn MacDonald, and musician Briana Marela.

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Open Screenings at the Film Forum

Free event!

Feb 09 - Apr 06

Are you a local filmmaker looking to share your work? Seeking feedback on your film? Want to see what other people are currently working on? Come join us for our monthly opening screening! Hang out with new and established filmmakers and experience films being made right here in our community.

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L’eclisse

Screening held at the Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Avenue
Post-screening discussion moderated by Sean Nelson!

Mar 10

(1962, Italy, 126 min)

L’eclisse is a gorgeous puzzle that begins with a romantic break-up: Vittoria, played by Monica Vitti, in her third role for Antonioni, only knows vaguely that something is wrong with the man she has been seeing. The camera knows it, too, framing a nearby water tower as if it had been erected on the moon. When Vittoria takes up with a young stockbroker, she is no less in doubt. One of the most beautiful and arresting films about a drifting state ever made.

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Seattle Web Fest

Free event!

Mar 14

Seattle Web Fest is a free web series festival that will take place at Northwest Film Forum on March 14, 2015. From 10am to 8pm, SWF will be screening over 40 web series from around the world, while hosting a series of panels from industry professionals.

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Red Desert

Screening held at the Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Avenue
Post-screening discussion moderated by James Tweedie!

Mar 17

(1964, 117 min)

Red Desert tells the story of a young woman, played by Monica Vitti, who seeks to survive in the modern world of anxiety and existential doubt. Antonioni's first color film is remarkable for the stunning industrial landscapes that seem to express the unease and alienation.

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The King and the Mockingbird

Mar 19 - Mar 22

(Paul Grimault, 1979, France, 83 min, DCP)

Based on a Hans Christian Andersen story, the wildly satirical The King and the Mockingbird follows a shepherdess and a chimney sweep who seek to escape from the clutches of a tyrannical king. A masterpiece of traditional hand-drawn cell animation, the film is credited by celebrated Japanese animators Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata as inspiring the creation of their own studio, the now world-famous Studio Ghibli. Brad Bird's The Iron Giant was clearly influenced by the towering robot menace in this film.

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An Honest Liar

Mar 20 - Mar 26

(Justin Weinstein, United States, 2014, DCP, 90 min)

An Honest Liar tells the incredible story of famed magician/skeptic and enemy of deception, James “The Amazing” Randi. A treasure trove of archival footages of performances and stunts (as well as interviews with the likes of Alice Cooper, Neil DeGrasse Tyson and Richard Dawkins), the film brings to life Randi's carefully-designed projects that publicly exposed psychics, faith healers and con artists with quasi-religious fervor. 

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Dust in the Wind

Please note screening locations!
Saturday, March 21 at Northwest Film Forum
Tuesday, March 24 at the Grand Illusion Cinema

Mar 21

(1986, 110 min, 35mm)

"Although the combination of lengthy shots and, in the early work, a relatively static camera has given Hou Hsiao-hsien an exaggerated reputation as a minimalist, his is above all a cinema of movement. The mobile train shot that begins Dust in the Wind, one of the key films of Taiwan’s New Cinema, generates a visceral sensation of forward momentum while also looking back to the medium’s nineteenth century origins. Hou vividly captures the confusion of young adulthood, but maintains a clear-eyed distance on the vicissitudes of ordinary lives by repeatedly returning to the landscape imagery of the opening shots. Based on the memories of screenwriter Wu Nien-jen, Dust in the Wind is both absorptive and reflective, encouraging viewers to continually refine their understanding of preceding scenes even when immersed in the unfolding present.  —Richard I. Suchenski"

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Flowers of Shanghai

Please note screening locations!
Monday, March 23 at Northwest Film Forum
Thursday, March 26 at at the Grand Illusion Cinema

Mar 23

(1998, 113 min, 35mm)

1884: In a brothel in Shanghai’s British area, four women build their lives, shut off from the outside world and surrounded by opium smoke, money and men. Acclaimed for its stunning 7-minute opening shot, sensuous cinematography and sophisticated construction of a microcosmic world, Flowers of Shanghai is based on a well-known 19th century Chinese novel.

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A Time to Live and a Time to Die

Please note screening locations!
Friday, March 20 at the Grand Illusion Cinema
Monday, March 23 at Northwest Film Forum

Mar 23

(1985, 136 min, 35mm)

Hou turned to his own coming-of-age story for one of his most acclaimed films, a tale that begins in 1947 and stretches over nearly twenty years. After the war, young Ah-hsiao (a fictionalized version of Hou) and his family move from China to rural Taiwan when his father secures a government job there. Ah-hsaio gets tangled up in street gangs, experiences his family’s evolutions and struggles, and eventually takes up a central role in keeping them together. Jonathan Rosenbaum called it “an excellent introduction to [Hou's] work as a whole.”

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The Passenger

Screening held at the Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Avenue
Post screening panel discussion!

Mar 24

(1975, 119 min, 35mm)

The Passenger stars Jack Nicholson as a television reporter in Africa who assumes the identity of a dead stranger. Tired of his work, his marriage and his life, he senses an opportunity for a fresh start in life, realizing—but too late—the danger he has put himself in. Nicholson considers this his finest performance.

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Millenium Mambo

Please note screening locations!
Wednesday, March 25 at Northwest Film Forum
Saturday, March 28 at at the Grand Illusion Cinema

Mar 25

(2001, 119 min, 35mm)

The sole contemporary-set feature of this retrospective is one of Hou’s most beautifully shot films—a ghostly story of ennui and regret.

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Good Men, Good Women

Please note screening locations!
Sunday, March 22 at at the Grand Illusion Cinema
Friday, March 27 at Northwest Film Forum

Mar 27

(1995, 108 min, 35mm)

Steeped in the communist history of 1940s Taiwan, the sensitively interlaced stories of Good Men, Good Women unfold as a film-within-a-film. Liang Ching, an actress, gets ready to star in a World War 2 era film about Taiwanese Communists who threw themselves into the anti-Japanese resistance. But when stolen pages of her diary start surfacing, painful memories of a dead lover trigger flashbacks. Past and present start to bleed together as the plot of the film mixes with Liang’s own personal history.

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VHSEX 3

Hosted by Spenser Hoyt and Brian Alter! 

There may be prizes!

Mar 27

Didn't get tickets to the Grand Illusion Cinema's VHSEX 3? Catch an encore screening at Northwest Film Forum on March 27. We're penetrating Scarecrow Video's Sexploitation room once again in search of more awkward adult situations, humorous humping and weird sexual interludes—all from vintage videotape! Adults only!

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Films for One to Eight Projectors: Multi-Projector Experiments by Roger Beebe

Visiting filmmaker! 
16mm prints!

Mar 28

Filmmaker/curator/professor Roger Beebe visits Seattle with a touring program of his multiple-projector performances. The tour features several of his best-known projector performances (including the six-projector show-stopping space jam “Last Light of a Dying Star”), recent award-winning work in single-channel HD video, as well as the premiere of his latest multi-projector mayhem, “SOUND FILM.” 

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Sabbatical

Director Brandon Colvin in attendance!
Seattle premiere!

Mar 29

(Brandon Colvin, 2014, United States, 72 min)

A lethargically neurotic Kierkegaard professor goes back to his small hometown on a sabbatical (intended for writing) to take care for his mother after a stroke. A ruminative deconstruction of the lonesome sentiment that we can never go home again, the film follows the protagonist, Ben, as he gets reacquainted with, and subsequently re-alienated from, the old relationships and trappings of his life. As he struggles to maintain his aloof composure while interacting with his deadbeat brother, addled mother and lonely ex-wife, Ben’s own shortcomings are thrown in sharper relief.

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Indigenous Showcase: Maria Tallchief

Filmmaker Sandy Osawa in attendance!
Co-presented with Longhouse Media!
Public reception at 6pm, Screening at 7pm

Apr 17

(Sandy Osawa, 2007, 57 min)

This documentary of ballerina Maria Tallchief's life and art captures the growth of ballet in America, as shown by Ms. Tallchief's own rise to fame, in original roles created for her by George Balanchine. Key archival clips include Swan Lake, Pas de Dix, Orpheus, Firebird, Black Swan and Les Sylphides

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